Question.


Tikki

Active Member
Do you know what colours her dam and sire are? Is he registered as as a specific colour?

Most important though, does it matter to you if your cute little pup is chocolate or red?

If you or your son son loves the puppy, just love him whatever colour he is.
 

EDG23

New Member
Yes the dam was a red and sire was a dapple piebald. The puppy is a shaded red, so she gave me a few other options and we choseca shaded cream. We would have still gotten him and loved him dearly. It was such a hard decision as i would get them all if i could! Papers and the AKC mean nkthing to me i just wanted to add another family member to love. I did a ton of research on breeds and temperaments and fell in love with the long hair mini dachshunds. I just wanted a pet/family member so color didn't mean much, they are all so beautiful. But i will say my dream mini dachshund is a long haired chocolate dapple piebald!
 

Tikki

Active Member
Sometimes the puppy you have dreamed of is not the colour you had dreamed of. Just love him as he is. And if he is not your dream long haired chocolate dapple piebaild mini - so what? Just love him for what he is and please never wish he was not what he is.

We all dream of what we want, but we all love what we have.

They chose us. So we love them for what they are. Not what we wish they might have been.
 

EDG23

New Member
Absolutely i already love Poppy and Jaxon so much. I was just saying im trying to talk my husband in to letting me get a chocolate dapple piebald girl that i found and is available.
 

Tikki

Active Member
I just wanted a puppy and Tikki wanted me. I had never known pure bred Doxie - Tikki just happened to a half Doxie, half Minpin. But she needed a momma and I needed a bubba.

I had never known Doxies but oh how I would love a mini. I know it would never happen so I just love my half Doxie who will be four-years-old tomorrow, having been with me since she was just 3-weeks old.
 

Tikki

Active Member
Why wont it happen?
I am too old for another puppy and my half Doxie is all I can cope with. I love her so much but I do not think she would be happy sharing me, and her space, with a puppy. But I really would love a mini although I know it is in my dreams.
 

Tikki

Active Member
Oh how beautiful. Those Doxie eyes are to die for and I would love to have that gorgeous wubble in my life;
 

Tikki

Active Member
I live in Israel so I do not think it would be possible to adopt a retired doxie from another country. And why whould people sell retired doxies? Would they not just wand a good forever home, not just sell them? There are far to many dogs in rescues without having sell those they no longer want.
 

CaseyKC

Member
I live in Israel so I do not think it would be possible to adopt a retired doxie from another country. And why whould people sell retired doxies? Would they not just wand a good forever home, not just sell them? There are far to many dogs in rescues without having sell those they no longer want.
Hi Tikki, I have been absent from this site for several years, for a variety of reasons. First, I couldn't figure out the new format. Then we had some human health issues, and then my precious, most beloved Libby died of a brain tumor. I was a mess and couldn't even look at a dachshund without bursting into tears for quite awhile after she went to the Rainbow Bridge. I swore up and down that I would never have another dog, would never open myself up to the deep, dark sense of loss that I felt from her passing. Then, I began my annual journey to Florida alone. For the previous eleven years, I had never driven that distance without my Libby acting as my "co-pilot on the trip. The drive is 1774 miles from my home to our annual rental in Florida. It is usually three days of driving and two nights in dog friendly motels. After driving this route for eleven years, I knew every dog friendly hotel/motel and rest area with doggie comfort areas on our route. So, the first day I started out, bright and early as I always do to avoid commuter traffic, without her in her car safety seat in the back of my car. I had been driving for several hours when I pulled into a rest area without even thinking about it. My hand unconsciously reached for her leash, and then it all came crashing down on me all over again. Libby was gone, I did not need to stop at a rest area for her convenience, and I felt the pain as acutely as I had during the months after her death. I am guessing this was around 9:00 o'clock in the morning. I sat there in total misery until a complete stranger tapped on my closed window to inquire if I was okay. I must have been sitting in that rest area for over six hours crying because it was beginning to get dark, as it always does early during the winter in New England. I assurred the stranger that I was fine, locked the car and went into the rest room, all the time thinking that I had to get a grip on my emotions, that Libby would always be in my heart, and that maybe, just maybe, I should think about getting another little girl to love. Since I had made very little mileage this day, and since I was exhausted after my emotional purge, I stopped at a motel, got a pizza and was in bed, fast asleep by 8 o'clock and actually slept until 8 oclock the next morning. I think it was the first time since Libby died that I slept through the night! So, I had two plus more days of driving, and thinking and came to the conclusion that I would adopt. Because I had been in dachshund rescue for so many years, I started inquiring with rescues. I think a lot of these people had lost any sense of compassion in the years since I was active in rescue. Some rescues told me I was too old and that they didn't adopt to anyone over 65 years old. Others turned me down because I don't have a fenced in yard, and one rescue was downright cruel, telling me that I hadn't taken very good care of my previous dog, Libby, because she had died at 11 years, 9 months, relatively young for a dachshund they said. For goodness sake, she had a brain tumor, was in severe pain, and ultimately had a grande mal seizure that left her blind and in excruciating pain. The veterinary emergency room I had taken her to, called in a canine neurologist who told me she exhibited all the classic signs of a brain tumor, that due to her age, surgery was not an option and the kindest thing would be euthanasia. He said that the sedative he had given her would wear off soon and she would be in screaming pain and terrified of the sudden onselt of complete blindness. As we had already been seeing her own veterinarian for two weeks when her symptoms first started, and since her own vet wouldn't listen to me when I told him something was terribly wrong, I could only agree with the canine neurologist. Libby died quietly in my arms and I was beyond grief, so I would like to know how the rescue that said I hadn't taken care of her thought I could have prevented a brain tumor. Anyway, I had heard that some breeders and show people placed their retired dogs and began a three month search for another little girl. One lovely lady had a little 5 year old girl and said I could meet her in May after she inspected my home, got references from non family members and paid a fee. Between March and May, this little girl had another dachshund jump on her back and would be looking forward to surgery, months of rehab if the surgery was successful, and the lady did not feel that in all good conscience that she could adopt this little girl out and would keep her the rest of her life regardless of the outcome. So, I was back to my search. Eventually I spoke to another lovely lady who wanted to meet me first. She was an AKC Breeder of Merit, and was very understanding of my emotional lapses when speaking of the love I had shared with my Libby. I was invited to her home and met my Annie Moon, who was pregnant and would be available the following September. I was approved and she and her husband told me the fee and compared to the price of a puppy, it was reasonable. So I went back to New England at the end of my stay in Florida and waited. In September, 2018, I drove back to Florida and picked up my Annie Moon. The search wasn't easy, but it was worth it, although Annie has a lot of emotional issues herself, but we totally bonded on the three day ride home and she is the proverbial velcro dog. I tell you all of this because I think I can answer why good and responsible breeders sell some of their retired dogs.

A Breeder of Merit (you can look up the requirements) has done DNA testing to rule out known dachshund diseases so they will not be passed on to offspring. They must produce a certain number of show ring champions, and conformation to the breed standard, health, and temperament are first and foremost in in any breeding. They have a lot of time and money invested in the dog /dogs that are nearing or have reached the end of optimal breeding ability. In the case of Annie's breeder, she would not breed a dog over 4 years old. If she wanted to continue to continue breeding, she would have to make room for any new dogs coming into her home. Thus she interviewed me, got numerous reference letters from friends and others who knew me and my Libby, from our veterinarian, and studied photos of my home and yard. If I had lived closer, she would have come in person to see for herself. The last, and to my way of thinking, the most important reason they charge a fee to prevent the dog from being put into an illegal dog fighting operation as a "bait dog," to be torn apart by fighting dogs in training or for practice in killing. It is my understanding that so many "free to a good home" dogs end up in this tragic situation. They have people who dress up nicely, who visit and take free dogs and turn them over to the dog fighters for bait. It is horribly illegal, but apparently quite frequent. Therefore, a charge of $400.00 or so not only helps the breeder continue his/her program, but the bad people collecting dogs for dreadful reasons aren't going to toss a dog costing that much money into a dog fighting ring to die a horrible death, so the fee actually is a little insurance policy for the adopted dog.

So with that said, how are you and your dachshund on stilts doing? I would love to hear from you.
 

Tikki

Active Member
Hello Casey - I wept when I read your story. and gave my Hetzi Doxie [half Doxie] on stilts extra cuddles. I do not know what an AKC Breeder of Merit is as I do not even know if there is a Dachshund register here. I had never even seen a Doxie here before I came across Tikva - only once ever saw a Pug and never saw a Griffon - those that I used to breed in another life in England. But then I smiled when I read further and read about Annie.

Tikva is now 4 years and 3 months old, weighs ~6.5 kg and is rock solid bone and muscle. She looks smaller then her weight would imply and she looks more like a Doxie as she gets older - longer legged though she is.


This is a year old photograph - I do not have any later pictures of her but I can definitely see the Doxie in her, so does our lovely vet, but she also shows the Minpin in her at times.

I love Tikki who makes every day worth getting up for. Especially as I know that she will be the last little dog I will ever be able to share my life with.

I hope you have as much pleasure with Annie and that she helps fill the empty space in your heart that was left when your beloved Libby went to The Bridge.

May her memory be for a Blessing.

Juli [Tikva's slave] xx
 

CaseyKC

Member
Thank you for your kind words in regard to Libby. I miss her every day and hope the legend of The Rainbow Bridge will come to pass when it is my time.

In the meantime, I have Annie. She is the first dog I have ever had that was not a puppy at the beginning of our life together and remains a learning experience for me. I think she has taught me to be ultra patient, to always speak in a quiet voice, and as aforementioned she is a velcro dog and she is never willingly out of my sight. Her breeder mentioned that she became to nervous and anxious in the show ring to continue that career so perhaps nerves and fear are inherent in her make up. She only is at peace when some part of her is touching some part of me, but even then, she is always on full alert for what she considers danger. She will allow no one but me to touch her, or put a leash on her, and will bark hysterically if anyone, family member, my husband, or a friend comes within three feet of her. The barking only occurs in my home, or in our Florida rental, not if we are visiting a friend, or taking a walk, or anyplace else, only in my house, so maybe she thinks she is protecting me, or guarding the house. I have tried a firm "no bark," coins in a can, (this scares her so badly that she pees,) a squirt bottle filled with water, one in every room, and we have been to two twelve week training sessions at the ASPCA, (she failed both courses and spent all 24 sessions hiding behind me) and I work with her daily. Perhaps there is a tiny bit of improvement, but no one else but me can see it, and even I am not certain if it is wishful thinking on my part. I did purchase a doggy stroller so that we can go out together. Before I got the stroller, everyone wanted to pet her. and even though I would tell them not to, some persisted in attempting to touch her, which created more hysteria, shaking, and fear. I honestly do not know if she would bite if I didn't intervene immediately. So the stroller has a zippered screened in enclosure so no one can stick a hand in to try to pet her. Honestly, some people are so rude, insisting that she just needs love. Well, she has plenty of love, but I do not want a law suit if she bites some one!

I cannot imagine that she was abused in her former home. I spoke to her breeder who was mystified by her hysterical barking behavior. Unfortunately her breeder died two months after I got Annie, so that is not a resource I can tap. The veterinarian put her on tranquilizers for awhile, but I honestly could see not improvement, other than she slept constantly, but was immediately awake if anyone but me entered the house. So, I have a problem child but will keep working with her and hope to find a solution for her sake and everyone else's ears. The good news is that she loves me and I love her and feel that she really needs me because no one else would put up with her constant barking. We will succeed, hopefully sooner than later.
 

Tikki

Active Member
Just love Annie and slowly slowly she will calm down. And yes, some people can be and are horrible. As for your veterinarian putting your baby on tranquilizers - I do not think what I dare say. Squirt bottles? Who on earth would think that is a help for a frightened little girl. And a frightened little girl will bite but "oh she is so cute" - I could scream reading about Annie.

I know I know that Tikva is only a half Doxie but she has 100% Doxie habits and oh can she be noisy at times. She hates cars parked outside, loathes and detests white vans, and she definitely gets hysterical at certain men dressed in a certain way.

I do not know anything much about Dachshunds but I do know they have a strong bite and are stubborn little people. But just because they are small and think they are big, and yes, they are very cute does not make strangers think they can just go up to them and pet them.
 
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